DJ RJ’s Modcast for 15 July 2013

 

Saint Etienne – “Railway Jam”
Department S – “Whatever Happened To the Blues?”
Dexys – “You”
Paul Bevoir – “Changing Places”
Madness – “Believe Me”
Gli Evangelisti – “Un ragazzo di strada”
Tony Clarke – “Landslide”
The Out Cast – “You’ve Gotta Call Me”
The Smiths – “Work Is A Four Letter Word”
Purple Hearts – “Plane Crash”
The Small Faces – “Tin Soldier”
The Meddyevals – “Place called Love”
The Kinks – “Village Green”
The Ordinary Boys – “Over the Counter Culture”
The Monochrome Set – “Two Fists”
Prince – “4 the Tears In Your Eyes”
Skandalous All-Stars – “Cult of Personality”
Alexei Sayle – “The Winebars of Old Hampstead Town”

Only Pop Music can save us now!

I don’t apologise about my fondness for pop music in the Mod idiom. Pop Music seems to get a bit of a bad rep in the Mod scene, my guess because it’s a bigger hit with the girls and queerboys, creating an inherently feminine association, and while that’s perfectly acceptable for the ladies, Mod gents are expected to be… not all “macho”, but still less feminine than the womenfolk or apparently effeminate queer men. Unfortunately, plenty of the overculture’s prejudices gravitate into the subcultures, and only those conscious of this (who are usually those most directly affected by it) have the nerve to put those prejudices within the subculture under a microscope. But enough about that for a mo’.

So without further ado, my top picks for Mod-oriented and / or Mod-friendly Pop Music:

Dexys Midnight Runners
While their first singles, the albums Searching For the Young Soul Rebels and Don’t Stand Me Down, and the early compilation Geno, are indisputably soul or one form or another as is the reformed-as-simply-Dexys record, One Day I’m Going to Soar, the middle DMR LP, Too-Rye-Aye is incredibly pop-oriented, and one of the most sold pop records ever crafted. I’ve also credited DMR with very literally saving my life at one point, so even the more pop-oriented tunes from their first full-length record are very dear to me.



Pete Townshend’s solo work
The Empty Glass album was loved by critics for it’s strong and subversive pop-rock writing and performances, but hated just as much because of presumptions that Pete kept the best songs for himself, letting The Who’s record from the same year, Face Dances, suffer from weaker tunes, which Roger once claimed to have felt betrayed by. Pete said he did it that way for reasons (one important one being that he was afraid that Roger wouldn’t want to sing the homoerotic “Rogh Boys” as it was written, and Townshend wanted to protect the integrity of the lyrics). In 1983, All the Best Cowboys Have Chinese Eyes was more artistically-focused, when compared to Empty Glass, and this seemed further reflected in the companion film videotape release. In 1985, Townshend released the concept record and companion direct-to-video film White City: A Novel, that he’s described as essentially stand-alone, but as something that could, should the viewer want it to, function as a sequel to Quadrophenia, taking place about twenty years later from Quadrophenia, and featuring a lead male named “Jim”, who attends night school and lives in a council flat. He’s released amazing pop and rock under his own name, and anybody who considers themself a fan of The Who needs to check it out.


Blue Ox Babes
Due to lots of reasons — from poor timing to mental illness — The Blues Ox Babes didn’t ever got the break they deserved in the early 1980s. Even Kevin Rowland has since admitted that he didn’t have the idea for the “Celtic Soul” thing until listening to some home demos from Kevin “Al” Archer’s post-DMR project, and Too-Rye-Aye quickly overshadowed The BOBs first couple singles, getting their record, Apples and Oranges, shelved for over two decades. Their entire body of work (later compiled and issued as Apples & Oranges by Cherry Red records in 2007) is really strong and entertains every feature, at various times, that makes for excellent Mod-friendly pop music.


The Style Council
As The Mod Male says, there are many things that The Style Council did so very right, even if Weller took their sound in a direction that didn’t go over very well with The Jam’s most loyal fans and eventually matured The Style Council in ways that turned off that band’s own fans. I got into The Jam first, but since I discovered the music of The Style Council, I’ve preferred their music tenfold, since —I know that’s practically blasphemy, to some, but that’s just how it is. I’m a fem, what can I say? Speaking of, maybe I’m just that way, but TSC made some of the most homoerotic music videos, ever. I’m bloody pissed that YouTube seems to have pulled the uncut vid for “Long Hot Summer”, which is certainly their most blatantly homoerotic clip —of course, even what remains is still pretty high on that scale.


The Compact Organisation
I’ve talked about this label before, and how Tot Taylor and Company had created some of the most perfect retro-1960s Mod-friendly pop music, ever. It’s hard for me to pick out one or two artists who’ve been associated with the label because in my opinion, every single one has been a winner, regardless of their relative success. Visually? From Mari Wilson’s signature beehive and Virna Lindt’s perfect blonde bob, to Cynthia Scott’s cat eve glasses and the clear homage to Georgie Fame that composes the cover of Tot Taylor’ Playtime LP, you can’t deny that the most memorable names on the label had the aesthetic down, and the music tended to confirm an understanding of the scene, more often than not, as well. Looking around at old photos from Revivalists in the early 1980s, also suggests that there was some relative popularity of the label amongst the Revivalist generation.


The Monochrome Set
Featuring ex-members of Adam and the Ants, Andy Warren and Lester Square, this idiosyncratic post-punk group defied genre pigenholing, while incorporating a lot of 1960s-influenced quirks, and cross-genre pop elements. Their sound evolved over time and reunions, but everything was consistently good and it was always a clear growth and maturation that went well with the band’s previous offerings, rather than detoured off into a sort of “combo mid-life crisis”. (I’ve selected three songs for The Monochrome Set to illustrate this maturation.)


Madness & Suggs
Their earliest records are more ska than pop, but they always dabbled in pop music. Always. Don’t deny it; every ska purist admits it (and well, almost anyone who realises that No Doubt stopped being even ska-punk after Gwen Stefani took over for her brother), and even they often admit to liking Madness. And they clearly got poppier as they went on. When Suggs attempted a solo career, he clearly went in a synth-pop direction that embraced a Mod-friendly aural aesthetic with notes of ska, reggae, and even clear influence in the then-vibrant acid jazz scene throughout.

As a complete aside, I don’t know why, but I always got the impression that these men listen to a LOT of DEVO. I don’t know why I get that impression, but I’m saying so now, cos I can’t think of a more appropriate way to bring it up.


The B-52s
Probably the kitschiest of all 1980s retropop groups, they also have a lot of the most solid pop songs. All of their singles are pretty cracking, and every song is made for dancing. Every. Single. Song. Not just the singles. but every song. And Kate Pierson can pony like no-one’s business. They’ve always had a strong understanding of the 1960s sounds, and a genuine, unironic love of kitsch culture, mix that with an inherently queerpunk sensibility and post-punk musical relevance that manages to remain ineffably fresh-sounding, in spite of the fact that their first two records are now about thirty-five years old. While some who were part of the Mod Revival maintain that the Sixties retro scene was different and barely had any overlap, that doesn’t really hold anymore, and regardless, not everyone “who was there” agrees. Seriously, kids, ask five people “who were there”, you’ll get ten different answers.


Nancy Sinatra & Lee Hazelwood
Contrary to common assumption amongst a lot of kids on the Internet or self-professed “originals” who didn’t get into Modernism until after they caught their first episodes of Ready Steady Go!, not everything out of the 1960s is related to the Mod subculture. In fact, I’d wager that even most of the instances from the Sixties wherein something is referred to as “mod” is just using an advertising buzzword of the day, much like how from 1979 and 1983, just about any band with a synthesiser or just a pop-punk sound was called “New Wave”, when the New Wave scene (or positive punk, or other regional terms) maintained itself as something distinct that, at most, was barely related to maybe 80% (or more) of that which got referred to as “new wave” amongst the music press (hell, at one point, Television was “new wave”, Elvis Costello was “new wave”, Roxy Music was “new wave”, and in the States The Jam was, I shit you not, referred to as “new wave”). So needless to say, Nancy and Lee were not Mods. On the back of Nancy’s Sugar record, Lee Hazlewood affectionately describes her saying “She’s so square she can get high on a glass of water.” They had nothing to do with Mod. Lee Halewood wrote a lot of songs, mostly influenced by country music or Leonard Cohen’s school of neo-folk and most of it retroactively genred as English Baroque, because a lot of it shared clear similarities. Aside from her much-covered single, “These Boots (Are Made For Walking)” (which has retroactively become sort of a Mod girl anthem), the pair produced a tonne of singles that have since gained cred, in spite of being painfully square at the time. A lot of their best work is also pretty downtempo, so you’ll probably only ever hear a few things in rotation at clubs, but it’s very lounge oriented.


The Go-Go’s
Possibly the seminal Los Angeles 1980s girl group, and sort of indirectly born of seminal LA hardcore punk group The Germs (Belinda Carslile was drummer for the latter for maybe a weekend, and after used to introduce them onstage at their earliest concerts). Their name certainly harkened to the 1960s cage dancers at some of the edgier nightclubs, and musically, they sounded like the artistic heiresses of The Breakaways. A few staples from the 1960s were a regular part of their sets, and they certainly knew how to work Sixties retro-kitsch with a modern flair, even if only on the album covers. Sure, they looked very painfully 1980s, from the spiky hair that now brings to mind a feminine take on Max Headroom, to the slash rouge that never flattered anyone’s features, to the baggy jumpers with hip-belts, but close your eyes — go ahead, do it. Now tell me they’re not the musical heiresses to those cute all-girl combos from the mid-1960s.


Tracey Ullman
Best known as a comedienne and actress, she had a short-lived stint as a pop singer, specialising in cute, quirky, Sixties-styled retropop. Her gender-swapped version of Madness’ “My Girl” is in line with the tradition of turning “The Girl from Ipenema” into “The Boy from Ipenema” when performed by a woman (a tradition later flipped off by Amy Winehouse). “They Don’t Know” and “Breakaway” were also really underrated singles that demonstrate a clear love for pop music of the early 1960s, especially the girl group sound. The video for “They Don’t Know” ends on a sad note, but overall a lovely video, and she looks just adorable.


The Fun Boy Three
After Terry Hall, Neville Staple, and Lynval Golding split from The Specials (but before Hall formed The Colourfield with Shale and Lyons from The Swinging Cats), The Fun Boy Three released two moody synthpop-based albums that stretched the limits of both synthpop and downtempo reggae, and made it really work. Occasionally cross-genre elements from the shoegaze and proto-gothic schools of post-punk were employed, and they still made it work. I’m convinced that there was nothing that The Fun Boy Three couldn’t make work, musically, if they attempted it, and I have their two very strong records to support this notion. Sure, they’re kind of responsible for putting Bananarama onto the world, but you know, I still think that Bananarama’s first two records, and most of the third, were pretty strong dance-oriented pop that does seem to maintain the spirit of the old girl groups, even if the musical aesthetic is vastly different from that normally accepted of girl groups at a Mod night.


The Police and Sting
You know how Madness’ sound, at least on record, got more pop-oriented as they band marched on? The Police turned that concept up to eleven going from a pop group obviously steeped in a strong reggae influence, to… I’m not sure what I’d call it, exactly, but it was pretty damned bland and their previous reggae-heavy sound was practically boiled out, with the odd remaining lipids of that sound occasionally surfacing. A lot of their later stuff, even I won’t listen to, but I really do appreciate the fact that Sting’s solo sound got more jazzy and soul-inspired for a period, and I generally like his post-Police work, even if there’s a lot I would leave at home on a DJ night.


General Public
I don’t know why, but I envision that, if this blog were more popular amongst Mods and Trad Skins, I’d catch a lot of hell for standing up for General Public, and I’ve slipped King’s “Love & Pride” into setlists at nights when I thought I could get away with it. General Public was practically a supergroup from the Mod Revival and 2Tone scenes, composed of Dave Wakeling and Ranking Roger (both formerly of The Beat), Mickey Billingham (DMR), Andy “Stoker” Growcott (DMR/The Bureau), Horace Panter (The Specials) and Mick Jones (The Clash —who were technically a punk band but with loads of affection amongst the Mod Revival and Ska scenes).

    The reasons I think I’d catch hell for this:

  • while their influences tend to remain fairly obvious, General Public made Tracie Young (who seems to get some undeserved flack) seem inspired. Hell, it kind of makes Matt Bianco’s later records seem inspired, and I don’t even try to make excuses for Matt Bianco’s records after their Indigo LP (though there are reasons I’m not including Matt Bianco on this particular list).
  • The video for “Tenderness” needs to die in a fire.
  • I don’t understand Roger’s racing stripes, either, and I keep the hair on the left side of my head violet for personal reasons.
  • Their music doesn’t work the same way that FB3’s music works, and that’s kind of disappointing. Still, their music works in a quirky sort of way.
  • Their cover of “I’ll Take You There”, originally performed by Mavis Staples / The Staples Singers for Stax, isn’t great, and I’m being polite, cos I actually really liked it when it first came out, but I was in junior high at the time, and I still liked the Buckingham-Nicks years of Fleetwood Mac at that age, without guilt. While I appreciate covers that put a unique spin on the song to make it distinct from the original recording, a well-loved staple of soul nights, like “I’ll Take You There”, really should get a cover that can hold its own. Listening as an adult, with matured tastes, there’s something about their cover that seems obvious that the last two members of General Public who had any interest in still being General Public were offered a spot on the Threesome soundtrack over a weekend, cos why? For most of the early 1990s, reggae had become trendy, and by ’94, that trend was kind of waning, so why not send it out with something from a well-loved band of the UK’s reggapop scene of the previous decade? Or something like that. But yeah, I’ll bet you ten dollars that this was recorded by Roger and Wakeling over a weekend, over-produced in the studio for the next week and a half, and in spite of the film flopping, the single nearly became of Top 20 hit in the States, which should speak to te general unimpressiveness of this version all on its own.

That said, while I have mixed feelings on 1995’s General Public record, Rub It Better (the group’s third and final), it’s certainly better than… That single… from the previous year. The video for “Rainy Days” is adorable, even if the song sounds overproduced. General Public is certainly more toward the “guilty pleasure” side of my favourite “Mod-friendly pop music”, but I don’t put them in that category simply because I do think a lot of their work is pretty solid, even if there are clear weaknesses —and like I said, that… single… was almost a gateway to ska for me —if I hadn’t had a brother-in-law who introduced me to Siouxsie Sioux and Rozz Williams that summer, between that and my lifelong love of The Who and art deco, I probably would’ve dove head first into Mod far earlier.

[Modcast 17-12-2012] DJ RJ’s Audio December Holiday Card III

Due to illness and a family loss this last few days, I’m sorry it took me as long as it has to finally post this. Give me another day or so and I’ll post a .zip file of individual tracks for easier portability.

 
Direct download link

The Soulful Strings – “Dance of the Sugarplum Fairy”
Lio, Helena Noguerra & Marie France – “Sleigh Ride”
The Pixies Three – “Cold Cold Winter”
Darlene Love – “All Alone On Christmas”
Claudine Longet – “I Don’t Intend to Spend Christmas Without You”
The Cocktails – “First Snowfall”
The Pipettes – “White Christmas”
Eleanor Rigby – “Kiss Me Quickly (It’s Christmas)”
The French Impressionists – “Santa Baby”
The Pilgrim Travellers – “I’ll Be Home for Christmas”
Jethro Tull – “Ring Out, Solstice Bells”
Mike Oldfield – “In Dulci Jublio”
Frank Sidebottom – “Christmas Is Really Fantastic”
Bad Manners – “Christmas Time Again”
The Business – “Step Into Christmas”
Dexys Midnight Runners – “Merry Christmas Everyone”
August Darnell – “Christmas On Riverside Drive”
Belle & Sebastian – “Santa Claus, Go Straight to the Ghetto”
Cristina – “Things Fall Apart”
Saint Etienne – “My Christmas Prayer”
The Attery Squash – “Santa’s Laughter Mocks the Poor”

The Dexys Story

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[2010-03-08] Idols

I like when I have a theme, and yesterday, I came up with a great theme — my idols. By that, i mean the musicians who have shaped my life and my creative process in certain ways that I can see, even when others can’t.

This, of course, implies “favourite artists of all time, ever”, but doesn’t necessarily imply “current top-X favourites” — nor does it imply that these are my favourite songs by these artists, as concern for time (I try to keep these casts under an hour) and flow/matching (not necessarily “beatmatching” — I’m also sure those of you who are well up on your muso trivia as I am have caught that I’ll make little in-jokes with song order, some jokes more obvious than others, I’m sure). For example, I tend not to listen to so much Queen these days, as I can get fairly weepy (having your favourite person in the world die when you’re ten can affect you), and even so, I rarely listen to “God Save the Queen” — but making it a closer to an opening of “Star-Spangled Bologna” just struck me as incredibly amusing.

 
[right-click here to download]

2010-03-08
The Evolution Control Committee – The Star Spangled Bologna
Marc Bolan – Dandy In the Underworld
Daucus Karota – Raw Power
Iggy & The Stooges – Gimmie Danger
Gavin Friday – Man of Misfortune
DEVO – Be Stiff
Dexys Midnight Runners – Soul Finger
Rufus Wainwright – Greek Song
Danielle Dax – Fizzing Human Bomb
Japan – Talking Drum
The Who – Armenia City In the Sky
Cat Stevens – Lovely City (When Do You Laugh?)
David Bowie – London Bye Ta-Ta
Secret Affair – Only Madmen Laugh
Prince & the Revolution – America
Marc Almond – Brilliant Creatures
Queen – God Save the Queen

[2009-12-21] It’s a Festivus Miracle!

I actually compiled this cast a couple of days ago so that I wouldn’t have to worry about selecting some Yultide Cheer at the last moment.

 
download

2009-12-21
The Soulful Strings – The Little Drummer Boy
The Pipettes – White Christmas
James Brown – Merry Christmas, I Love You
Eartha Kitt – I’m Gettin’ Nuttin’ For Christmas
The Del Vetts – I Want A Boy For Christmas
The Waitresses – Christmas Wrapping
Eleanor Rigby – Kiss Me Quickly (It’s Christmas)
Danielle Dax – Blue Christmas
Dexys Midnight Runners – Merry Christmas Everybody
Marc Bolan – Christmas Bop
Shonen Knife – Space Christmas
The Jacobites – Teenage Christmas
The Kinks – Father Christmas
The Dead Milkmen – All I Want For Christmas Is a Job
Marc Almond – Christmas In Vegas
Klaus Nomi – Silent Night
Tiny Tim – The Christmas Song
Mae West – My New Year’s Resolution

2009-12-07

 

To both listeners, if you’re hoping for Christmas music, I’m going to put that off until December 21 — in theory, I could do a new cast of Christmas music every week, and have it all different, but I want to save stuff for next year.

As for this week’s set, I know I don’t like to do any one band two weeks in a row, and i think I did that last week, too, but sometimes a set works best with a specific song or two, and it cannot be helped.

2009-12-07
Cat Stevens – Baby Get Your Head Screwed On
The Koobas – The First Cut Is the Deepest
P.P. Arnold – Angel of the Morning
Dexys Midnight Runners – My Life in England
The Kinks – Victoria
Brian Auger – Ellis Island
The Fall – Prole Art Threat
Nino Ferrer – les Blues Anti-Bourgeois
Blue Ox Babes – Yes Let’s
Manual Scan – Nothing Can Be Everything
The High Number – I’m the Face
The Jam – Down In the Tube Station At Midnight
The Inmates – Dirty Water
The Chords – The British Way of Life
Secret Affair – Streetlife Parade

[ModCast for 2009-11-23] Go Red, Get Head

…at least that’s how it works out in my experiences. Yes, Communists and Socialists get laid more; I’m still not 100% on how that works out, but it’s totally true.

So I’ve got a new WordPress theme for the site and I’ve decided that the cast is going to be more ‘My Week in Music” — at least until I get bored with that concept. And hey, better start that now then two weeks ago, when it would have been a lot of Leonard Cohen and Rufus Wainwright. Unfortunately, only part of the cast really fits my last week in any specific way, and that is in two ways:

1) after an entire adolesence and young adulthood spent hating Morrissey, I’m starting to like Morrissey. Thankfully, I don’t see myself turning into one of those insane pod-persons who seem dead certain that Morrissey Can Do No Wrong, musically or otherwise, but the man’s not a terrible songwriter. Of course, as a singer myself, i have to admit that I like Morrissey better as a songwriter than as a singer.

2) I have new Docs. Made in England, Oxblood red, and sized UK6 (U$ Men’s 7) — technically I’m a UK5 wide, but try finding those. Anywhere. Little Boy’s section or otherwise.

 
download link

2009-11-23
Cat Stevens – Matthew & Son
Velvet Underground – European Son
David Bowie – London Bye Ta-Ta
Dexys Midnight Runners – T.S.O.P. (The Sound of Philadelphia)
Television – (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction
The Rolling Stones – Sympathy For the Devil
Franz Ferdinand – Evil and a Heathen
Powder – Magical Jack
Neil’s Children – Getting Evil In the Playground
Morrissey – Suedehead
Segue
Madness – Nightboat To Cairo
The Coventry Automatics – Concrete Jungle
Symarip – These Boots Are Made For Walking (Stompin’)
Alexei Sayle & Radical Posture – Doctor Marten’s Boots

2009-11-16: New Dance

So, OK, I know i promised this weeks ago, but things happen when you’re Ruadhan J McElroy.

This week’s Modcast is songs that inspired characters and scenes in my second novel, New Dance, which is available on Amazon.com right now:

Click here to read the back-of-the-book description of New Dance and for valuable purchase links.

…the story is very character-driven and plot is meandering — but then again, so is most of Truman Capote’s work.

 

R. Dean Taylor — “Back Street”
The Monochrome Set — “The Jet Set Junta” (Jacky’s theme)
Dexys Midnight Runners — “There There My Dear” (Gaz’s theme)
David Bowie — “DJ” (Alice’s theme)
Secret Affair — “What Did You Expect” (Jace’s theme)
The Fall — “Just Step S’ways” (Nino’s theme)
Brian Auger & The Trinity — “Back At the Chicken Shack” (Dougan’s theme)
Mari Wilson — “Let Me Dream”
The Specials — “Nite Klub”
Twiggy — “Beautiful Dreams” (Eliza’s theme)
Rip Rig + Panic — “Eros (What Brings Colour Up the Stem)”
Makin’ Time — “Nothing Else”
The Jam — “Absolute Beginners”
The Purple Hearts — “Can’t Help Thinking About Me”
John’s Children — “Just What You Want – Just What You’ll Get”
Japan — “I Second That Emotion”

“Back Street” inspired the name of the club the characters regard as their favourite — both as I wrote and in the story.

“The Jet Set Junta” was partially what inspired this scene with Jacky beating the crap out of three other young men after Gaz was attacked by them. The song that initially inspired it was “3-5-0-0″ from the soundtrack to HAIR, but I was listening to “The Jet Set Junta” as I went back and polished it up, edited, etc….

Gaz was listening to “There There My Dear” by DMR in a scene where, after back home in Belfast for a week, and in his own blue funk, he meanders down to the kitchen for breakfast with his mother. I hesitate to call this one his “theme” as I’m not sure what this says about his personality, but he was a main character in this one, and I felt compelled to associate a song with him on this mix.

I decided that Alice was a David Bowie fan as I was setting up her background, which included being a long-time DJ of Rhythm & Blues, soul, garage, psych, etc…, so I put a bunch of David Bowie in WinAmp while writing another scene. Lodger was an album I’d listened to only seldom before them, and so when “DJ” came on, sparks of Alice’s personality seemed apparent in the emotional tone Bowie used in his voice whilst recording that one. There’s a causticity alternating with nonchalance that I think helps round out Alice’s character nicely.

I decided that Nino’s favourite band was going to be The Fall, cos that’s one of my own personal favourites. I made his “theme” one of my favourite songs of theirs from the years appropriate to the time of the novel — which has its story-line ending in 1983. Nino is alarmingly literate and wise for being the youngest amongst the characters, and his parents are “deep old-schoolers” and intellectuals, making him an oddity amongst them, and The Fall has also been one of those plain quirky and weird bands that exists outside the realm of genre. My decision wasn’t random.

“What Did You Expect” was selected for Jace because it’s lyrically melancholy, implies alcoholism as an escape, and I decided that Jace’s favourite band was Secret Affair.

Dougan’s personality really didn’t bring itself out to me until I decided that his father was Black. After that, it just made sense that he was a bit more introverted than the others, he has a good-standing relationship with his mother, and even an amicable one with the man his mother implies is his father. It also seemed very apparent that Dougan most allows himself to express his feelings through music, and he took up the piano (and later Vox Continental organ) after discovering Brian Auger at about the age of eleven or twelve. I think the Auger instrumental i chose “for Dougan” adds something to his character that I only hinted at in the story, and that even i don’t feel I hinted at very well.

“Beautiful Dreams” directly inspired Eliza’s “big scene” — those pages would not have happened if I hadn’t decided to hit “back” to repeat this one and really listen to how Twiggy emotes this one. The lyrics have nothing to do with the scene, and while Twiggy has a flawed, almost tinny soprano (which almost compliments Eliza’s otherwise flawed, one-sided character of “the selfish girl everybody secretly hates, but puts up with”), she’s pretty good at emoting as she sings (and the other characters, at least those who have a band together, put up with Eliza cos she’s a good emotive singer). I think Twiggy seems to actually “cry” through her voice in this one, and when i picked up on that, Eliza was given a chance to break down and cry, and apologise to the others for something she had done. This song also doesn’t “fit in” very well with the others, and Eliza is absent through most of the book, except to act as a catalyst for something or another — basically, she doesn’t fit in very well with the others.

“Eros (What Brings Colour Up the Stem)” inspired a concert scene moreso than the song I named in that scene did.

I chose the cover of “Can’t Help Thinking About Me” cos 1) I’d already used a Bowie song, and I didn’t want to use another, and 2) listen to the lyrics. This song is about gayness. If you can’t hear it, then you just may be lacking some grey matter.

“I Second That Emotion”, I realised, was left off the track-listing for the CD-Rs that i gave away at the book signing *after* I had already printed out the tray cards. You have no idea what a pain in the rear I was having printing them out. I selected this for the mix because… Honest answer? David Sylvian and Mick Karn are gods among men. Do not argue with me about this.

Modcast Archive: Direct Hits setlist for 2008-06-10

I really don’t want to upload this as it is, but I cheated both listeners out on a Wednesday cast last week, and I don’t want to pull that shit again this week.

Now, not all of my stuff on LP is backed-up / duplicated on mp3 — in fact, most of it is not. Hell, most of my CD’s aren’t simply because I don’t have the space. Four songs from my June 10th, 2008 set at Direct Hits are songs I currently have on vinyl only — in fact, three of them, I thought I had on mp3, but it turned out that I didn’t, and the only reason I didn’t just download them is because I had a huge crisis last night that was more important than hunting down four songs on slsk.

 

(v) ≠ “vagina”; (v) = song I currently only have on vinyl
(r) = request

The Spiders – Why Don’t you Love Me?*
The Bureau – Only For Sheep
(v) Tina Turner – The Acid Queen
(v) The Rolling Stones – Route 66
Makin’ Time – Two Coins For the Ferryman
(r) Gloria Jones – Tainted Love
Jacques Dutronc – Et Moi, Et Moi, Et Moi
Twiggy – When I Think of You
Nino Ferrer – Alexandre
Les Cappuccino – les Filles Madison
Sharon Tandy – Daughter of the Sun
Dexys Midnight Runners – Breakin’ Down the Walls of Heartache
Eleanor Rigby – I Want to Sleep With You
(v) The Kinks – Well-Respected Man
Mod Fun – 99th Floor
(v)David Bowie – Ching-A-Ling
Brian Auger & Julie Driscoll – Wheel’s On Fire
Arthur Brown – Fire

*U$ group, not the Japanese group