DJ RJ’s Modcast for 15 July 2013

 

Saint Etienne – “Railway Jam”
Department S – “Whatever Happened To the Blues?”
Dexys – “You”
Paul Bevoir – “Changing Places”
Madness – “Believe Me”
Gli Evangelisti – “Un ragazzo di strada”
Tony Clarke – “Landslide”
The Out Cast – “You’ve Gotta Call Me”
The Smiths – “Work Is A Four Letter Word”
Purple Hearts – “Plane Crash”
The Small Faces – “Tin Soldier”
The Meddyevals – “Place called Love”
The Kinks – “Village Green”
The Ordinary Boys – “Over the Counter Culture”
The Monochrome Set – “Two Fists”
Prince – “4 the Tears In Your Eyes”
Skandalous All-Stars – “Cult of Personality”
Alexei Sayle – “The Winebars of Old Hampstead Town”

DJ RJ’s Modcast: Sing a song of when I loved…

 

Attilla the Stockbroker – “Burn It Down”
Leonard Nimoy – “Where Is Love?”
Sandie Shaw – “Til the Night Begins To Die”
Rinaldi Sings – “Heaven Knows”
Cat Stevens – “The First Cut Is the Deepest”
The Smiths – “Back to the Old House”
Menswe@r – “Being Brave”
The Jacks – “Gloomy Flower”
The Flaming Stars – “God Told Me to Do It”
The Small Faces – “Up the Wooden Hills to Bedfordshire”
Paul Weller – “You Do Something to Me”
David Bowie – “The Prettiest Star (orig. studio w/ Marc Bolan)
Tot Taylor – “Australia”
Fosca – “Assume Nothing”
Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds – “All Tomorrow’s Parties”
Siouxsie & the Banshees – “The Last Beat of My Heart”

Modcast – In Memoriam

 

Elvis Costello – “Tramp the Dirt Down”
Chumbawamba – “Fitzwilliam”
Billy Bragg – “Thatcherites”
Morrissey – “Margaret On the Guillotine”
The Specials – “Maggie’s Farm”
The Beat – “Stand Down Margaret”
Hefner – “The Day That Thatcher Dies
Klaus Nomi – “Ding Dong (The Witch Is Dead)”

Sorry this is backdated, but unaware that one of history’s great monsters was going to bless us with a stroke, I’d obligated the day to being a responsible adult. On the good side, the cast seemed to upload especially fast.

“If Morrissey would just have a cheeseburger and a good shag, he’d cheer up.” -almost everybody I’ve known since 1995

There’s just something about this photo where, the only commentary I really have for it is “Why can’t we see Morrissey’s hands?” And yet, I really don’t want an answer to that question. Not formally, with words, anyway —after all, doesn’t that blissful half-smile with closed eyes already answer that question sufficiently?

This photo is also directly responsible, in part, for my thought process in bringing up one of the most arguably surreal convo topics at Direct Hits (the Ann Arbor, Michigan areas now essentially defunct Mod & Trad-Skin night) about four years ago —a conversation revisited (and, unfortunately, not filmed for posterity) at OWOT10 in Chicago: How would Morrissey properly make love to a cheeseburger? Apparently, there is more than one answer, and all are potentially correct.

The other thing directly responsible? Earlier that NYE of 2008, I’d learned of an interview where Morrissey admitted to finally being part of a sexual relationship, but was insistent on being so secretive about it that he wouldn’t even reveal this person’s gender; I proposed that the object of his affections therefore lacked any gender whatsoever, and was arguably not even a person, but a cheeseburger. After all, considering that I’ve heard the proposal “If Morrissey would just have a cheeseburger and a good shag/lay/screw/etc…” for years, on two continents and from people who don’t know each-other, surely this has gotten back around to him, so why not kill two birds with one stone? In for a penny, in for a pound.

I have since scripted a comic of that very scenario (or at least the scenario I think is most likely the correct one) that my friend Susie Beeca has been working on.

“If Morrissey would just have a cheeseburger and a good shag, he’d cheer up.” -almost everybody I’ve known since 1995

There’s just something about this photo where, the only commentary I really have for it is “Why can’t we see Morrissey’s hands?” And yet, I really don’t want an answer to that question. Not formally, with words, anyway —after all, doesn’t that blissful half-smile with closed eyes already answer that question sufficiently?

This photo is also directly responsible, in part, for my thought process in bringing up one of the most arguably surreal convo topics at Direct Hits (the Ann Arbor, Michigan areas now essentially defunct Mod & Trad-Skin night) about four years ago —a conversation revisited (and, unfortunately, not filmed for posterity) at OWOT10 in Chicago: How would Morrissey properly make love to a cheeseburger? Apparently, there is more than one answer, and all are potentially correct.

The other thing directly responsible? Earlier that NYE of 2008, I’d learned of an interview where Morrissey admitted to finally being part of a sexual relationship, but was insistent on being so secretive about it that he wouldn’t even reveal this person’s gender; I proposed that the object of his affections therefore lacked any gender whatsoever, and was arguably not even a person, but a cheeseburger. After all, considering that I’ve heard the proposal “If Morrissey would just have a cheeseburger and a good shag/lay/screw/etc…” for years, on two continents and from people who don’t know each-other, surely this has gotten back around to him, so why not kill two birds with one stone? In for a penny, in for a pound.

I have since scripted a comic of that very scenario (or at least the scenario I think is most likely the correct one) that my friend Susie Beeca has been working on.

[2001-06-20] More Downtempo & Covers

Well, once again, it’s been several weeks since I’ve uploaded anything to here, and while I feel like offering an explanation, I can’t really think of anything beyond “INTERNET, LET ME TELL YOU — IT IS *HARD* TO THINK OF DIFFERENT MUSIC TO PLAY EVERY WEEK!!” Especially when my audience is apparently a tiny one — some may think that makes it easier, but when I don’t have a regular influx of ideas of new stuff to play, you’re basically going to get a lot of David Bowie, Japan, Secret Affair, The Fall, English Baroque, and Power Pop with a pretty regular rotation of Pizzicato 5. Left to my own devices, I’d probably have a Mod night of just The Berlin Trilogy, and the Glory Boys, I Am Kurius Oranj, and Big Hits & Jet Lag albums — and I am dead serious.

 
2011-06-20
Mari Wilson & the Wilsations – Beat the Beat
The Monochrome Set – Lester Leaps In
Les Cappuccino – Bande a Part
Nouvelle Vague – Too Drunk to Fuck
Television Personalities – Makin’ Time
Biff Bang Pow! – There Must Be a Better Life
Pizzicato 5 – Summertime Summertime
Variety Lab – London In the Rain
Angie Bowie – I Just Wanna Have Something to Do (Mambo Mix)
Sandie Shaw – A Girl Called Johnny
Brian Auger & the Trinity w/ Julie Driscoll – Light My Fire
Flaming Stars – You Don’t Always Want What You Get
Fun Boy Three – Our Lips Are Sealed
Hollywood Mon Amour (featuring Skye) – A View To a Kill
The Smiths – Oscilate Wildly
Gene – I Say a Little Prayer

[2010-09-06] In Monoraul!

I almost made a post of nothing but this song (at about 12:44, there’s a chorus of “It’s Labour Day!”, and I have to say, this is possibly the most wonderful song I’ve ever heard — but I listen to Yoko Ono and Iannis Xenakis, your opinion probably differs), but I like both my listeners — I wouldn’t do that to you.

I was hoping to putt another theme, but gods above, do you have any idea how lacking in the topic of labour is the music of a subculture composted by an overwhelming majority of working-classes? It’s very lacking. Very, very lacking.

So no theme for this one, I wish I could, but fuck it, maybe next time.

This is the longest set I’ve posted in a while, so this will make up for the fact that I forgot to post something last week, like I said I would — which I apologise for, but I woke up last Monday and honestly forgot it was Monday until quarter til midnight — and then I remembered that since I’m doing this in WordPress, I can set it to post things at a specific time and date, to avoid this. Which is what I’m doing now. Podcasting from the past! …or maybe I’m podcasting to the future? Either way, please, let this blow your freakin mind — or just tell me it did.

Also, please donate to the tip jar. I really want to go see some friends in Baltimore (and stalk John Waters, perhaps) later this year, and that cannot happen without delicious monies.

 

2010-09-06
Boys Next Door – Boy Hero
Roxy Music – Do The Strand
Shakespear’s Sister – Excuse Me John
The Smiths – Handsome Devil
The Monochrome Set – Silicone Carne
Cat Stevens – Lovely City (When Do You Laugh)
Nancy Sinatra & Lee Hazelwood – Lady Bird
Billie Davis – Billy Sunshine
The New Constitution – No Easy Way
Paul Weller – Peacock Suit
Them – Bright Lights, Big City
The Fall – City Hobgoblines
Art Brut – Blame It On the Trains
Gavin Friday – Kitchen Sink Drama
Leonard Cohen – Stories of the Street
Rufus Wainwright – Old Whore’s Diet (w/ Antony Hegarty)

[2010-03-01] Music to Scrub Your Kitchen To

Don’t judge me! You have no right to judge me!

I will argue this in the simplest way possible — it is well-established among people who study these things that suedeheads listened to glam rock, Slade was at one time promoted as a Skinhead band, and anybody who fails to see the musical evolution from The Who’s “My Generation” to Vox Pop’s “Just Like Your Mom” is only fooling themselves.

That said, is there anything better to scrub down a kitchen during the waning of your annual winter depression than Glam & Punk Rock? No, no, there really isn’t. You can try and argue with me, but you’ll be wrong. How do i know? It’s my podcast, and I said so. So :-p

Be glad I didn’t break out the Guns N’ Roses this week (as I could have easily reasoned their inclusion in this week’s cast — I’ve already included The Germs and Vox Pop, and Vox Pop included Don Bolles’ then-girlfriend Mary “Dinah Cancar” Simms, who not only briefly dated Nikki Sixx from Motley Crue, but who is also included in the thank-yous on Appetite For Destruction, along with her and Bolles’ later band, 45 Grave), and be glad I spared you the Rozz Williams (which I have been listening to a lot of this week, for some reason I can’t figure out — and who’s music I’d be able to reason into here not only because 45 Grave gets on nod on Christian Death’s first album, only Theatre of Pain, but also because Don Bolles is featured in the last known photo taken of Rozz Williams), and be glad I spared you This Is Where the Fish Lives (which is my own noise project, and which I would have reasoned into this by pointing out that I once slept on Don Bolles’ couch) — no, this is punk rock and glam at its … well, maybe not at its finest, but at its loudest, its most enthusiastic, and its least intelligent, or (as much as I love Marc Bolan) at least its least comprehensible.

 
[click this link to download]

2010-03-01
Slade – Get Down, Get With It
MC5 – Kick Out the Jams
The Stooges – T.V. Eye
Jayne County – Everyone’s An Asshole But Me
Sweet – Wig Wam Bam
Stiv Bators – Swingin’ A-Go-Go
Pansy Division – On Any Other Day (<– and be glad I spared you all “Bill & Ted’s Homosexual Adventure”, because the last thing I need is somebody e-mailing me, telling me that they got fired for listening to this at work) The Smiths – Bigmouth Strikes Again The Germs – Forming Vox Pop – Just Like Your Mom New York Dolls – Trash Cuddly Toys – You Keep Me Hangin’ On Raped – Moving Target Richard Hell & the Voidoids – Love Comes In Spurts Rocket From the Tombs – Sonic Reducer Sigue Sigue Sputnik – Love Missle F1-11 T Rex – Funky London Childhood

[2010-02-01] Chroma

One of the greatest influences on my sense of identity and how I relate to art I both enjoy and create has been Derek Jarman. There used to be a video rental in this town that was the only place I could rent his films (until I started collecting them on DVD, that is), and of the “great directors” have stuff in all sorts of the categories that Liberty Street Video would put arrange their videos, while others only had things in one or two sections. Jarman was a “one or two sections” director, much like another one of my favourite (though not nearly as influential) directors, John Waters. All of John Waters’ films at Liberty Street you could find under “cult” (this was also the only place I’ve ever seen legit copies of Multiple Maniacs and Mondo Trasho available for rent); Derek Jarman’s films were placed either under “Foreign – UK & Ireland” or under “Queer Interest”, and that, I think, sums up his film career as a director in as few words as possible while still making it clear that there may be more to it.

Derek Jarman is what happens when painters are given a Super 8 camera by a friend and get it in their head that they can make feature-length films; and I mean this as a great compliment. The first film of his that I ever saw was Jubilee, and the experience had this paradoxical quality of both opening my eyes to “Punk” in a way I’d never fathomed before, and at the same time summing up my own thoughts on history and culture in a way that I could make sense out of.

As I noted, he was a painter before he started making films, and most child psychologists tend to agree that when a child is drawing any kind of picture, they’re drawing an unconscious self-portrait in allegory. There’s this innocent quality to many of his films, and at the same time, you get the feeling that even when he’s giving us biographical film-portraits of famopus figures passed, that this is an intensely personal look at Jarman’s own self.

His creative process danced freely between careful planning and spontaneous improvisation. Jubilee was both filmed and written over the course of two weeks, the majority of the script was sparse, save for a few monologues that Jarman had to use, but every pre-production choice in casting, every second of editing, was all very meticulous and the whole project took roughly a year and a half to complete, for example. His creative process was also heavily influenced by those who worked with him, and he was just as likely to take script ideas from a cameraman, or costuming and set ideas from an actor as he was to use his own.

Had an AIDS-related death not come to him in 1994, Derek Jarman would have had a sixty-eighth birthday yesterday, 31 January — but I’d rather not dwell on sadness, but instead celebrate his life.

You see, Jarman also did a handful of music videos in his time, and so that’s part of what’s populating things this week — the other part is music from four of his films (Jubilee, Caravaggio, Edward II and The Garden). Just to keep things sounding interesting, I threw in a couple of covers to fill things out.

 
[download link]

2010-02-01
Sexgang – At Your Own Risk
Suzi Pinns – Rule Britannia
Carter USM – Panic
The Smiths – The Queen Is Dead
Pet Shop Boys – Rent
Marc Almond – Tenderness Is a Weakness
Marianne Faithful – Broken English
Annie Lennox – Every Time We Say Good-bye
Simon Fisher-Tuirner – All Roads Lead to Rome
Suzi Pinns – Jerusalem
Chumbawamba – Song for Derek Jarman
The Garden – Think Pink (originally from FUNNY FACE)

[2010-02-01] Chroma

One of the greatest influences on my sense of identity and how I relate to art I both enjoy and create has been Derek Jarman. There used to be a video rental in this town that was the only place I could rent his films (until I started collecting them on DVD, that is), and of the “great directors” have stuff in all sorts of the categories that Liberty Street Video would put arrange their videos, while others only had things in one or two sections. Jarman was a “one or two sections” director, much like another one of my favourite (though not nearly as influential) directors, John Waters. All of John Waters’ films at Liberty Street you could find under “cult” (this was also the only place I’ve ever seen legit copies of Multiple Maniacs and Mondo Trasho available for rent); Derek Jarman’s films were placed either under “Foreign – UK & Ireland” or under “Queer Interest”, and that, I think, sums up his film career as a director in as few words as possible while still making it clear that there may be more to it.

Derek Jarman is what happens when painters are given a Super 8 camera by a friend and get it in their head that they can make feature-length films; and I mean this as a great compliment. The first film of his that I ever saw was Jubilee, and the experience had this paradoxical quality of both opening my eyes to “Punk” in a way I’d never fathomed before, and at the same time summing up my own thoughts on history and culture in a way that I could make sense out of.

As I noted, he was a painter before he started making films, and most child psychologists tend to agree that when a child is drawing any kind of picture, they’re drawing an unconscious self-portrait in allegory. There’s this innocent quality to many of his films, and at the same time, you get the feeling that even when he’s giving us biographical film-portraits of famopus figures passed, that this is an intensely personal look at Jarman’s own self.

His creative process danced freely between careful planning and spontaneous improvisation. Jubilee was both filmed and written over the course of two weeks, the majority of the script was sparse, save for a few monologues that Jarman had to use, but every pre-production choice in casting, every second of editing, was all very meticulous and the whole project took roughly a year and a half to complete, for example. His creative process was also heavily influenced by those who worked with him, and he was just as likely to take script ideas from a cameraman, or costuming and set ideas from an actor as he was to use his own.

Had an AIDS-related death not come to him in 1994, Derek Jarman would have had a sixty-eighth birthday yesterday, 31 January — but I’d rather not dwell on sadness, but instead celebrate his life.

You see, Jarman also did a handful of music videos in his time, and so that’s part of what’s populating things this week — the other part is music from four of his films (Jubilee, Caravaggio, Edward II and The Garden). Just to keep things sounding interesting, I threw in a couple of covers to fill things out.

 
[download link]

2010-02-01
Sexgang – At Your Own Risk
Suzi Pinns – Rule Britannia
Carter USM – Panic
The Smiths – The Queen Is Dead
Pet Shop Boys – Rent
Marc Almond – Tenderness Is a Weakness
Marianne Faithful – Broken English
Annie Lennox – Every Time We Say Good-bye
Simon Fisher-Tuirner – All Roads Lead to Rome
Suzi Pinns – Jerusalem
Chumbawamba – Song for Derek Jarman
The Garden – Think Pink (originally from FUNNY FACE)