DJ RJ’s Modcast for 15 July 2013

 

Saint Etienne – “Railway Jam”
Department S – “Whatever Happened To the Blues?”
Dexys – “You”
Paul Bevoir – “Changing Places”
Madness – “Believe Me”
Gli Evangelisti – “Un ragazzo di strada”
Tony Clarke – “Landslide”
The Out Cast – “You’ve Gotta Call Me”
The Smiths – “Work Is A Four Letter Word”
Purple Hearts – “Plane Crash”
The Small Faces – “Tin Soldier”
The Meddyevals – “Place called Love”
The Kinks – “Village Green”
The Ordinary Boys – “Over the Counter Culture”
The Monochrome Set – “Two Fists”
Prince – “4 the Tears In Your Eyes”
Skandalous All-Stars – “Cult of Personality”
Alexei Sayle – “The Winebars of Old Hampstead Town”

DJ RJ’s Modcast: Sing a song of when I loved…

 

Attilla the Stockbroker – “Burn It Down”
Leonard Nimoy – “Where Is Love?”
Sandie Shaw – “Til the Night Begins To Die”
Rinaldi Sings – “Heaven Knows”
Cat Stevens – “The First Cut Is the Deepest”
The Smiths – “Back to the Old House”
Menswe@r – “Being Brave”
The Jacks – “Gloomy Flower”
The Flaming Stars – “God Told Me to Do It”
The Small Faces – “Up the Wooden Hills to Bedfordshire”
Paul Weller – “You Do Something to Me”
David Bowie – “The Prettiest Star (orig. studio w/ Marc Bolan)
Tot Taylor – “Australia”
Fosca – “Assume Nothing”
Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds – “All Tomorrow’s Parties”
Siouxsie & the Banshees – “The Last Beat of My Heart”

Ex-Goth Revelations

73811_The Beatles are about as Mod as Marilyn Manson is Goth, which is to say that if you were one before x-band got ridiculously popular, or completely independent of said band, you’re at least 90% less likely to consider the band to be at all related to your subculture than an outsider would assume. On the other hand, if said band was your gateway to the subculture, chances are far more likely that even if you no longer think they’re necessarily of the subculture, you’ll probably think they’re still important to the subculture, if only as, well, a gateway. You know, they’re kind of a misunderstood caricature of each subculture that’s ironically gained a modicum of credibility cos, well, kids and stuff.

The answer to “What’s the difference between a Mod and a trad skin?” and “What’s the difference between a trad goth and a romantigoth?” are the same: At least two stone to the latter, with an optional addition of ten years, and/or less hair for the gents. The implication of the joke is “when you’re young and / or slim, you’re the former, and then you age into the latter.” This is usually tongue-in-cheek, even though it generally speaks to an assumed-to-be-acceptable amount of sizeism and ageism in both scenes. 1089569-fook_mi___austin_powers_by_yayacosplay--001

Where the overculture’s caricatures of punk and hippie subcultures are, generally speaking, more accurate than inaccurate (feel free to disagree, but I speak from experience), the overculture’s caricatures of Mods and Goths are, generally speaking, more inaccurate than accurate (again, feel free to disagree…) Where punks and hippies generally ignore the stereotypes, Mods and Goths seldom do, but will generally regard the stereotyping disdainfully when outside subcultural spaces (seriously, watch an outsider ask a Mod about the Austin Powers films, or ask a Goth about Fairuza Balk’s character in The Craft), but will laugh at it amongst themselves.

The+Who+WhoHalloween1It’s fairly easy to break up each subculture into several “types”. It’s also easy to compare the Mod/Skinhead division to the Goth/Industrial (or Rivethead) division. Both divisions happened fairly early on, and it is generally fairly easy for one from X-side to move back-and-forth between that and Y-side; it’s also not as easy as some would like to believe to pinpoint the exact year or band/musician that sparked the division, though some hypotheses (1969, or Symarip’s “Skinhead Moonstomp”, etc…; 1980, Genesis P-Orridge, etc…) are certainly more popular than others. To the untrained eye and / or the unaware outsider, it might be difficult to tell the differences between a Mod and Skinhead or between a Goth and Rivethead, and there are more than enough “insiders” who really stopped giving a fuck about compartmentalising everyone at the clubs years ago, because it’s really not as important as some people might want to believe. Morrissey-My-Life-With-Morr-317378

Generally speaking, racism and queerphobia is considered fundamentally antithetical to both subcultures, and it’s actually pretty damned easy to point to examples in the history of each subculture to support this fact, if you actually understand the histories, but every so often, you run into some person or another, and let me tell you, Internet….

And as I’ve said before, there is a clear and noticeable trend of Goths “ageing into” Mods. To be fair, though, some age into Rockabilly or revival Teds —but to be fair, I have it on good authority that the animosity between Mods and Rockers was blown WAY out of proportion by the press. And some shoegaze bands, especially Joy Division and The Smiths, are honestly equally popular among both subcultures, and it’s easy to find people in each cult that will point to Morrissey or Ian Curtis and say “obviously, this man is one of our own”.

[2001-06-20] More Downtempo & Covers

Well, once again, it’s been several weeks since I’ve uploaded anything to here, and while I feel like offering an explanation, I can’t really think of anything beyond “INTERNET, LET ME TELL YOU — IT IS *HARD* TO THINK OF DIFFERENT MUSIC TO PLAY EVERY WEEK!!” Especially when my audience is apparently a tiny one — some may think that makes it easier, but when I don’t have a regular influx of ideas of new stuff to play, you’re basically going to get a lot of David Bowie, Japan, Secret Affair, The Fall, English Baroque, and Power Pop with a pretty regular rotation of Pizzicato 5. Left to my own devices, I’d probably have a Mod night of just The Berlin Trilogy, and the Glory Boys, I Am Kurius Oranj, and Big Hits & Jet Lag albums — and I am dead serious.

 
2011-06-20
Mari Wilson & the Wilsations – Beat the Beat
The Monochrome Set – Lester Leaps In
Les Cappuccino – Bande a Part
Nouvelle Vague – Too Drunk to Fuck
Television Personalities – Makin’ Time
Biff Bang Pow! – There Must Be a Better Life
Pizzicato 5 – Summertime Summertime
Variety Lab – London In the Rain
Angie Bowie – I Just Wanna Have Something to Do (Mambo Mix)
Sandie Shaw – A Girl Called Johnny
Brian Auger & the Trinity w/ Julie Driscoll – Light My Fire
Flaming Stars – You Don’t Always Want What You Get
Fun Boy Three – Our Lips Are Sealed
Hollywood Mon Amour (featuring Skye) – A View To a Kill
The Smiths – Oscilate Wildly
Gene – I Say a Little Prayer

[Modcast for 2010-07-12] I’m back!

Basically, I’ve had to start using another program for the Modcast, in addition to a dozen other hectic things that have been preventing me from uploading regularly.

Since the last time I’ve uploaded, I went to the Mod MayDay special event of Direct Hits at Goodnight Gracie in Ann Arbor, and the annual Mod Chicago Our Way of Thinking weekender. Met some awesome people I hadn’t met on previous years, and I might be visiting Baltimore later this year.

I’ve also implemented a new system that will hopefully help me remember to update this thing better every week.

Here’s this week’s playlist:

 
2010-07-12
Qypthone – Modernica In the Office (audio play)
Nomoto Karia – “M.O.D.E.L. Agent”
Pizzicato 5 – Twiggy Twiggy/Twiggy vs James Bond
The Smiths – This Charming Man
Sandie Shaw – Hand In Glove
Jasmine Minks – Think
Float Up C.P. – He Loves Me (No, No, No)
Tenpole Tudor – Fashion
Mick Karn & Midge Ure – After A Fashion (extended version)
Fun Boy Three – Our Lips Are Sealed
The Coventry Automatics – Concrete Jungle
The New Hearts – City Life
Secret Affair – Somewhere In the City
The Fall – Victoria
Squeeze – Hesitation (Rool Britannia)
The Kinks – Mr Churchill Says
The Evolution Control Committee – Rebel Without A Pause (Whipped Cream Mix)

[2010-03-01] Music to Scrub Your Kitchen To

Don’t judge me! You have no right to judge me!

I will argue this in the simplest way possible — it is well-established among people who study these things that suedeheads listened to glam rock, Slade was at one time promoted as a Skinhead band, and anybody who fails to see the musical evolution from The Who’s “My Generation” to Vox Pop’s “Just Like Your Mom” is only fooling themselves.

That said, is there anything better to scrub down a kitchen during the waning of your annual winter depression than Glam & Punk Rock? No, no, there really isn’t. You can try and argue with me, but you’ll be wrong. How do i know? It’s my podcast, and I said so. So :-p

Be glad I didn’t break out the Guns N’ Roses this week (as I could have easily reasoned their inclusion in this week’s cast — I’ve already included The Germs and Vox Pop, and Vox Pop included Don Bolles’ then-girlfriend Mary “Dinah Cancar” Simms, who not only briefly dated Nikki Sixx from Motley Crue, but who is also included in the thank-yous on Appetite For Destruction, along with her and Bolles’ later band, 45 Grave), and be glad I spared you the Rozz Williams (which I have been listening to a lot of this week, for some reason I can’t figure out — and who’s music I’d be able to reason into here not only because 45 Grave gets on nod on Christian Death’s first album, only Theatre of Pain, but also because Don Bolles is featured in the last known photo taken of Rozz Williams), and be glad I spared you This Is Where the Fish Lives (which is my own noise project, and which I would have reasoned into this by pointing out that I once slept on Don Bolles’ couch) — no, this is punk rock and glam at its … well, maybe not at its finest, but at its loudest, its most enthusiastic, and its least intelligent, or (as much as I love Marc Bolan) at least its least comprehensible.

 
[click this link to download]

2010-03-01
Slade – Get Down, Get With It
MC5 – Kick Out the Jams
The Stooges – T.V. Eye
Jayne County – Everyone’s An Asshole But Me
Sweet – Wig Wam Bam
Stiv Bators – Swingin’ A-Go-Go
Pansy Division – On Any Other Day (<– and be glad I spared you all “Bill & Ted’s Homosexual Adventure”, because the last thing I need is somebody e-mailing me, telling me that they got fired for listening to this at work) The Smiths – Bigmouth Strikes Again The Germs – Forming Vox Pop – Just Like Your Mom New York Dolls – Trash Cuddly Toys – You Keep Me Hangin’ On Raped – Moving Target Richard Hell & the Voidoids – Love Comes In Spurts Rocket From the Tombs – Sonic Reducer Sigue Sigue Sputnik – Love Missle F1-11 T Rex – Funky London Childhood

[2010-02-01] Chroma

One of the greatest influences on my sense of identity and how I relate to art I both enjoy and create has been Derek Jarman. There used to be a video rental in this town that was the only place I could rent his films (until I started collecting them on DVD, that is), and of the “great directors” have stuff in all sorts of the categories that Liberty Street Video would put arrange their videos, while others only had things in one or two sections. Jarman was a “one or two sections” director, much like another one of my favourite (though not nearly as influential) directors, John Waters. All of John Waters’ films at Liberty Street you could find under “cult” (this was also the only place I’ve ever seen legit copies of Multiple Maniacs and Mondo Trasho available for rent); Derek Jarman’s films were placed either under “Foreign – UK & Ireland” or under “Queer Interest”, and that, I think, sums up his film career as a director in as few words as possible while still making it clear that there may be more to it.

Derek Jarman is what happens when painters are given a Super 8 camera by a friend and get it in their head that they can make feature-length films; and I mean this as a great compliment. The first film of his that I ever saw was Jubilee, and the experience had this paradoxical quality of both opening my eyes to “Punk” in a way I’d never fathomed before, and at the same time summing up my own thoughts on history and culture in a way that I could make sense out of.

As I noted, he was a painter before he started making films, and most child psychologists tend to agree that when a child is drawing any kind of picture, they’re drawing an unconscious self-portrait in allegory. There’s this innocent quality to many of his films, and at the same time, you get the feeling that even when he’s giving us biographical film-portraits of famopus figures passed, that this is an intensely personal look at Jarman’s own self.

His creative process danced freely between careful planning and spontaneous improvisation. Jubilee was both filmed and written over the course of two weeks, the majority of the script was sparse, save for a few monologues that Jarman had to use, but every pre-production choice in casting, every second of editing, was all very meticulous and the whole project took roughly a year and a half to complete, for example. His creative process was also heavily influenced by those who worked with him, and he was just as likely to take script ideas from a cameraman, or costuming and set ideas from an actor as he was to use his own.

Had an AIDS-related death not come to him in 1994, Derek Jarman would have had a sixty-eighth birthday yesterday, 31 January — but I’d rather not dwell on sadness, but instead celebrate his life.

You see, Jarman also did a handful of music videos in his time, and so that’s part of what’s populating things this week — the other part is music from four of his films (Jubilee, Caravaggio, Edward II and The Garden). Just to keep things sounding interesting, I threw in a couple of covers to fill things out.

 
[download link]

2010-02-01
Sexgang – At Your Own Risk
Suzi Pinns – Rule Britannia
Carter USM – Panic
The Smiths – The Queen Is Dead
Pet Shop Boys – Rent
Marc Almond – Tenderness Is a Weakness
Marianne Faithful – Broken English
Annie Lennox – Every Time We Say Good-bye
Simon Fisher-Tuirner – All Roads Lead to Rome
Suzi Pinns – Jerusalem
Chumbawamba – Song for Derek Jarman
The Garden – Think Pink (originally from FUNNY FACE)

[2010-02-01] Chroma

One of the greatest influences on my sense of identity and how I relate to art I both enjoy and create has been Derek Jarman. There used to be a video rental in this town that was the only place I could rent his films (until I started collecting them on DVD, that is), and of the “great directors” have stuff in all sorts of the categories that Liberty Street Video would put arrange their videos, while others only had things in one or two sections. Jarman was a “one or two sections” director, much like another one of my favourite (though not nearly as influential) directors, John Waters. All of John Waters’ films at Liberty Street you could find under “cult” (this was also the only place I’ve ever seen legit copies of Multiple Maniacs and Mondo Trasho available for rent); Derek Jarman’s films were placed either under “Foreign – UK & Ireland” or under “Queer Interest”, and that, I think, sums up his film career as a director in as few words as possible while still making it clear that there may be more to it.

Derek Jarman is what happens when painters are given a Super 8 camera by a friend and get it in their head that they can make feature-length films; and I mean this as a great compliment. The first film of his that I ever saw was Jubilee, and the experience had this paradoxical quality of both opening my eyes to “Punk” in a way I’d never fathomed before, and at the same time summing up my own thoughts on history and culture in a way that I could make sense out of.

As I noted, he was a painter before he started making films, and most child psychologists tend to agree that when a child is drawing any kind of picture, they’re drawing an unconscious self-portrait in allegory. There’s this innocent quality to many of his films, and at the same time, you get the feeling that even when he’s giving us biographical film-portraits of famopus figures passed, that this is an intensely personal look at Jarman’s own self.

His creative process danced freely between careful planning and spontaneous improvisation. Jubilee was both filmed and written over the course of two weeks, the majority of the script was sparse, save for a few monologues that Jarman had to use, but every pre-production choice in casting, every second of editing, was all very meticulous and the whole project took roughly a year and a half to complete, for example. His creative process was also heavily influenced by those who worked with him, and he was just as likely to take script ideas from a cameraman, or costuming and set ideas from an actor as he was to use his own.

Had an AIDS-related death not come to him in 1994, Derek Jarman would have had a sixty-eighth birthday yesterday, 31 January — but I’d rather not dwell on sadness, but instead celebrate his life.

You see, Jarman also did a handful of music videos in his time, and so that’s part of what’s populating things this week — the other part is music from four of his films (Jubilee, Caravaggio, Edward II and The Garden). Just to keep things sounding interesting, I threw in a couple of covers to fill things out.

 
[download link]

2010-02-01
Sexgang – At Your Own Risk
Suzi Pinns – Rule Britannia
Carter USM – Panic
The Smiths – The Queen Is Dead
Pet Shop Boys – Rent
Marc Almond – Tenderness Is a Weakness
Marianne Faithful – Broken English
Annie Lennox – Every Time We Say Good-bye
Simon Fisher-Tuirner – All Roads Lead to Rome
Suzi Pinns – Jerusalem
Chumbawamba – Song for Derek Jarman
The Garden – Think Pink (originally from FUNNY FACE)